IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications
08-13 October 2017 – Montreal, QC, Canada

CFP / WORKSHOP PAPERS

IEEE PIMRC 2017 solicits the submission of workshop papers within the technical scope of the conference. The proposed workshops listed below offer a unique opportunity for in-depth discussions where researchers and industry entities are invited to share their state-of-the-art research and development results on specific areas and novel challenging topics.


SCOPE

The demands for high data rates and ultra-reliable coverage become demanding issues due to increase number of population in the world by 2020. The huge demand for high quality life makes the administrator and the governments to put carefully planning in cities in a smarter way. As a premier agent for stimulating a quality of life compatible with a resource efficient economy, the smart city phenomenon has recently seized the imagination of the academia and the industry significantly. As the Internet of things (IoT) and Tactile Internet are predictable to be a primary driving force for future cities, advanced communication methods will play a crucial role in assisting real-time data acquisition and utilization from distributed sensors. However, smart cities will also have to function within the limitations of the national economy and available resources. Consequently, the challenges in the realization of smart cities are many and varied. In general, low energy consumption, constrained bandwidth, latency and budgetary limitations are predominating. In order to overcome these hurdles, it is essential that new ideas and theories for optimizing the network in energy, spectral, latency and monetary terms are presented to achieve a robust environment monitoring and sustainable transportation network, among other provisions. This led the researchers to pave the way for future wireless networks under the umbrella of 5G communications as well. This is an amalgamation of a multitude of technologies ranging from device-level algorithms such as low power transmissions to system-level architectures such as software-defined networking (SDN), the challenges posed by each of these techniques are critical. The smart city idea is also known to work at the intersection of various techniques such as device-to-device (D2D) communications, massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), millimeter wave (mmWave) communications, full-duplex transmissions and Internet of Things (IoT) to name a few.

TOPICS

  • 5G oriented smart cities
  • Big data and cloud computing in smart cities
  • Internet of things and automation in smart cities
  • Cognitive radio in smart cities, and ultra-dense network
  • Energy harvesting technologies and communications
  • Communication in smart grid and green communications and computing
  • Novel network architecture design
  • Cooperative communications, mmWave and Massive MIMO design for transmissions
  • Resource-efficient cross-layer optimization
  • Energy-efficiency and spectral-efficiency
  • Antennas design and channel modeling
  • Machine-to-machine communications and smart drones communications Safety, security, and privacy for smart cities
  • Smart transportation systems and infrastructure (V2V, V2I)
  • Applications, deployments, test-beds and experimental experience for communications in smart cities

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Symeon Chatzinotas, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Rui Dinis, Universidade, Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Portugal
Syed Ali Hassan, National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan
Dushantha Nalin K. Jayakody, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia (Lead Co-Chair)

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-01.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

 


SCOPE

There has been a vast increase in the range and proliferation of wireless technologies over recent decades, which has led to the crowding of existing spectrum. Among available solutions to address the resulting congestion and shortage of capacity, cognitive radio (CR) and spectrum sharing concepts have been envisioned. Such concepts will be particularly important in the context of 5G communication systems, where despite the introduction of novel mm-wave “pioneer bands”, there will be evermore increased pressure – especially on lower-frequency spectrum. This is due to the coverage and reliability requirements of 5G, in tandem with vastly increased capacity and throughput. CR and other spectrum sharing paradigms can address such issues through increasing the net spectrum available to each particular user. CR can also serve other benefits, such as enhancing the management, performance and coexistence of heterogeneous networks with diverse radio access technologies. It is widely expected that new emerging technologies applied in 5G networks will enable pioneering services, making 5G both socially beneficial and economically viable. Advanced solutions must be identified in both technical and regulatory domains to realize CR and spectrum sharing for such 5G and other future networks. Towards such ends, this workshop aims to gather and promote discussion among researchers, engineers, practitioners, and end-user groups, with the goal of inspiring the analysis and development of CR and spectrum sharing solutions for future networks. A key focus of this workshop is on the practical implementation of the above concepts, and “shift-to-market” considerations. Moreover, this workshop also focuses on issues, advances and challenges in various research domains related to cognition and wider spectrum sharing schemes in future generation communication systems and networks.

TOPICS

  • Signal processing for cognitive applications
  • SDN and SDR for CR and spectrum sharing
  • Cognitive communication security
  • Cognitive MAC protocols
  • Cognitive RRM mechanisms
  • Cognitive self-organized networks (SONs)
  • CR for 5G networks
  • Cognitive HetNet, D2D, M2M and V2V networks
  • Solutions for combined access to diverse spectrum opportunities, including spectrum aggregation techniques
  • Energy and spectral efficient CR networks
  • Geolocation/spectrum databases for CR and spectrum sharing
  • Cognitive small cells and heterogeneous networks
  • Spectrum regulation and management aspects for cognitive 5G networks
  • Spectrum sharing and inherent challenges for carrier aggregation
  • Spectrum sharing in 5G HetNets
  • Spectrum Sharing in Satellite Bands, protection of satellite incumbents
  • 3D spectrum sharing, in particular protection of satellites, drones, etc.
  • Spectrum sharing in mm-wave bands
  • Novel applications of CR technology
  • New wireless communication technologies for rural broadband using white spaces (MIMO, full-duplex radios, hierarchical cells, novel waveform design)
  • Spectrum access systems (SAS)
  • Licensed-shared access (LSA)
  • TV white spaces
  • Innovative methods of white spaces identification
  • Underlay wide area coverage networks
  • Regulatory frameworks for spectrum management and dynamic access

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Kareem Baddour, Communications Research Centre, Canada
Faouzi Bader, CentraleSupélec, France
Panagiotis Demestichas, University of Piraeus, Greece
Oliver Holland, King’s College London, UK (Lead Co-Chair)
Adrian Kliks, Poznan University of Technology, Poland
Yiouli Kritikou, WINGS ICT Solutions, Greece
Markus Mueck, Intel Mobile & Communications Group, Germany

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-02.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

 


SCOPE

The proliferation of wireless devices in the upcoming evolution of 5G will have a profound impact on the communications industry. Wireless traffic will also surge due to the increasing per-device data demand from novel services and applications. These changes to the wireless communications landscape are driving the demand for ultra-dense wireless network deployments. In recent years, this demand has led to a growing interest in optical wireless (OW) networks as a novel solution. Researchers have shown promising data rates for OW communications via Infrared (IR), visible light communication (VLC), and ultraviolet (UV) technologies. These high data rate capabilities coupled with the directionality of the optical medium allow OW small cells to provide very high bandwidth density (b/s/m2). Accordingly, densely distributed OW small cells have the potential to provide additional wireless capacity in the indoor environments where it is needed most.

Compared to traditional RF networks; these OW deployments can provide very high aggregate capacity; however, densely distributed OW small cells are challenged to accommodate highly dynamic environments. Specifically, the OW channel is susceptible to blocking and the smaller coverage region of each cell implies that devices with high mobility will change connections frequently. In order to mitigate the impact of these limitations, heterogeneous networks (HetNets) have been proposed where OW networks supplement traditional RF small cell networks – combining the aggregate capacity gains of the former with the coverage and reliability of the later. These Coexisting Radio and Optical Wireless Deployments, or CROWD networks, are of high interest as we look for new ways to accommodate the demand that will be placed on next generation wireless networks.

The intent of this workshop is to bring together researchers who are exploring analysis and implementation techniques for integration of RF and OW networks through a coexistence framework.

TOPICS

  • Optical Wireless and 5G
  • Seamless connectivity in dynamic environments
  • Mobility and handoff in RF/OW HetNets
  • Reliability in the presence of OW signal outages
  • RF/OW HetNet Infrastructure
  • Resource allocation techniques
  • Data aggregation techniques
  • Network architecture
  • Network layout
  • Asymmetric connectivity
  • Adaptive RF/OW networks
  • RF/OW HetNets for IoT
  • Multimedia communications in RF/OW HetNets
  • Security and privacy in RF/OW HetNets
  • Hardware integration for RF/OW HetNets
  • Testbed development and deployment

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Moussa Ayyash, Chicago State University, USA
Hany Elgala, University at Albany, USA
Abdallah Khreishah, New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA
Thomas D.C. Little, Boston University, USA
Michael Rahaim, Boston University, USA (Lead Co-Chair)

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-03.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

 


SCOPE

The key challenges in the success of mobile applications are the ability to personalize to the customer requirements, and the trustworthiness of the application through security and dynamic update of information. This workshop explores potentials and constraints of personalization of mobile applications and challenges for smart cities and smart citizens. New techniques and methodologies for personalization such as indoor localization, bi-channel communication between service providers and users are within the scope of the workshop. Furthermore, processes for user-centric design such as co-creation, techniques for secure access and dynamic data updates for secure smart cities and smart citizens are of special interest. As a novel and exciting addition, this workshop includes a specialist tutorial session on “Co-creation technique – the user-centric living labs approach” presented by Mr. Grahame Smith, Head of Allied Health at LJMU. The participants for the tutorial session will be selected based on their EOI expressed through a short description. Also our industry partners will run a product “elevator pitch” session (EOI required). Brief descriptions of the intended panel sessions are given below.

  • Mobile applications for mission critical services such as disaster recovery: This session will explore novel intelligent mobility models and protocols to provide temporary communication infrastructure in effectively managing the rescue operation.
  • Personalized mobile applications in transport for smart cities: One of the deciding factors on a city’s status as a smart city are the transport facilities. The transport sector has been working hard to enhance the end-to-end journey experience of their customers. In recent years, there have been several calls for funding applications focusing on this theme. In addition, they also explore ways of enhancing the user experience through stations. The challenges for this focus could be personalizing the information provided to the user, the ability to locate the user indoors/underground, facilitating bi-channel communication between service providers and service users. This session will explore new techniques for indoor location, personalization, dynamic data analysis or cloud computing for providing quality of service for smart cities.
  • Personalized mobile applications in healthcare for smart citizens: Mobile applications in the healthcare sector have increased rapidly, all vying for the customer base that want to take control of their health and independent living. However, the success depends on the application’s ability to sustain user engagement. Co-creation or participatory design as termed by the health and psychology experts is a proven way of motivating the users and sustaining their engagement with the tool. This session will explore techniques and methodologies for co-creation. Lessons learned from challenges and benefits gained from opportunities in healthcare applications will also be explored.

TOPICS

  • Communication interface for user interactions with smart devices
  • Data analytics techniques for dynamic updating of information
  • Techniques and algorithms for indoor location
  • Mobile applications for user experience through stations
  • Privacy and security in mobile applications
  • Co-creation or participatory design techniques
  • Smart interactions of mobile applications for enhancing user experience

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Nik Bessis, Edge Hill University, UK
Keeley Crockett, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
Mesut Günes, University of Magdeburg, Germany
Princy Johnson, Liverpool John Moores University, UK (Lead Co-Chair)
Sergio Toral MarÍn, University of Seville, Spain

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-05.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

Workshop homepage:

 


SCOPE

Full-duplex (FD) has been considered as an advanced radio technology for next generation communication systems. It breaks the barrier of today’s communications by supporting bi-directional communications without time, frequency and spatial duplexers. By transmitting and receiving at the same time, on the same frequency and on the same spatial link, full-duplex has the potential to double the system capacity and reduce the end-to-end latency. The major challenge for a FD capable device (e.g., a FD capable base station or a FD capable user equipment) is how to effectively cancel the self-interference (SI) that consists of the leakage and reflection of its own transmitting signal which can be more than 100 dB stronger than the sensitivity level of a receiver. In the past few years, SI cancellation techniques have attracted considerable attention from both industry and academia, and have made remarkable progress in design, implementation and prototyping. Multi-stage and cross-domain approaches involving antenna design, analogue and digital signal processing have made FD technology feasible for future communication products.

In the meantime, research and investigation of FD-enabled communication networks are on the horizon. The implication and impact of FD-enabled devices on the throughput and scheduling of FD networks have been widely studied. Traditional communication networks have been challenged by the additional interference caused by FD nodes and devices. One issue that is particularly detrimental to FD networks is the additional mutual interference (MI) among FD capable nodes and devices when all or some of them operate in full-duplex mode. It suggests that network-wide SI and MI cancellation and mitigation are needed, and FD-aware and FD-optimum upper layer protocols are keys to capitalizing FD gains in FD networks.

TOPICS

  • SI and MI channel models and measurements in FD networks
  • Antenna design for SI and MI suppression
  • Analogue SI and MI cancellation techniques
  • Digital SI and MI cancellation techniques
  • Tracking and adaptation of SI/MI channel and environment
  • Information theory on FD devices and networks
  • Throughput analysis and demonstration for FD networks
  • FD MIMO and massive MIMO systems
  • FD mmWave systems
  • FD relay systems
  • FD-optimal scheduler and upper layer protocols
  • Experimental and trial results of FD systems and networks

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Jaehoon Chung, Advanced Standard R&D Lab, LG Electronics, Korea
Tho Le-Ngoc, McGill University, Canada
Shilpa Talwar, Wireless Communications Research, Intel Labs, USA
Huan Wu, Huawei Technologies, Canada (Lead Co-Chair)

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-06.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

 


SCOPE

Different from conventional mobile network designs primarily optimizing the transmission efficiency of single service (e.g., voice/video streams), industry and academia have agreed with the manifold wireless features to be supported by the fifth generation networks (5G). In Sep. 2015, International Telecommunication Union, Radio-communication Sector (ITU-R), has identified three categories for these upcoming wireless features, including enhanced mobile broadband, eMBB (for high data rate transmissions in ultra-high resolution voice/video streams, mobile social networks, virtual/sensory reality), ultra-reliable and low latency communications, URLLC (for low latency and reliable data exchange in unmanned driving, intelligent transportation systems, industrial automation), and massive machine-type communications, mMTC (for small size packets and massive amount of terminal in smart grid/city, sensor networks, Internet-of-Things). In the meantime, ITU-R has also identified the radio transmission requirements of 5G (known as International Mobile Telecommunications 2020, IMT-2020), including 20 Gbps peak data rate, 100 Mbps user experienced data rate, 10 Mbps/m2 area traffic capacity, 106 devices/km2 connection density, 1 ms latency and mobility up to 500 km/h.

To this end, 3GPP consequently launched the standardization activity of 5G New Radio in 2016 to frame Release 15 as the Phase-I 5G specifications. To satisfy these unprecedented radio transmission requirements, a number of technologies not involved in LTE-Advanced will be adopted by New Radio, including utilizing spectrum above 6 GHz (up to 100 GHz), beamforming in both the control and user planes, gNBs with multiple remote transmission/ reception points (TRPs), frame structure with agile resource arrangement, non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA), new waveforms, etc. In Phase-II specifications, new radio sidelink transmissions, mobile backhaul, unlicensed access, ultra-dense network/access, etc., are also projected for support. In addition to these radio access technologies, network function virtualization (NFV), software-defined network (SDN), network slicing, open stack/architecture are also considerably studied for the next generation core network. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together state-of-the-art innovations, research activities (both in academia and industry), and the corresponding standardization impacts of New Radio, so as to understand the inspirations, requirements, and the promising technical options to boost and enrich activities in the area of New Radio.

TOPICS

  • New waveforms, NOMA, multi-user superposition transmission (MUST), beamforming based radio access in New Radio
  • Radio resource and interference management for eMBB, URLLC, and mMTC
  • Ultra-dense network, multiple TRPs, cloud radio access network, massive MIMO for New Radio
  • Sidelink, mobile backhaul, unlicensed transmissions for New Radio
  • SDN, NFV, network slicing, open architecture for next generation core
  • Standardizations of New Radio
  • Impacts of innovative applications supported by New Radio (e.g., wearable devices, unmanned vehicles/robots, drones, augmented reality, kinesthetic/ sensory/ virtual reality)
  • Simulation platform, prototypes, and field-trials for New Radio

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Mohammed Atiquzzaman, University of Oklahoma, USA
Jong-Hyouk Lee, Sangmyung University, Korea
Shao-Yu Lien, National Formosa University, Taiwan (Lead Co-Chair)
Chih-Cheng Tseng, National Ilan University, Taiwan

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-09.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

 


SCOPE

With the developments and applications of wireless communications, more and more applications require advanced radio transmission technologies (RTT) to reach the goal of high power and spectrum efficiencies as well as flexibility and adaptation to multiple scenarios such as mobile broadband, ultra reliable communications, the internet of things, etc.

Recently, intelligent optimization and self-learning algorithms have been widely studied as potential solutions. Among the latter, the vey promising evolution algorithms aim to find the optimal operating point of complex non-continuous cost functions using biologically inspired techniques such as genetic algorithms and particle swarm optimization.

Self-learning algorithms are lighted up with the success of machine learning in the artificial intelligence field. Given the strong requirements expected from RTT and the fruitful achievements in evolution and self-learning algorithms (ESLA), it is foreseen that applying ESLA to RTT may solve some of the most daunting challenges in wireless communications.

TOPICS

  • Overview of intelligent optimization
  • Overview of machine-learning algorithms
  • Massive MIMO with ESLA
  • Position/location estimation with ESLA
  • Radio resource management with ESLA
  • Signal detection with ESLA
  • Channel estimation and tracking with ESLA
  • Channel coding and decoding with ESLA
  • Power control with ESLA

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Xiaojie Wang, BUPT, China
Yi Wang, Huawei Technologies, China (Lead Co-Chair)

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-10.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

 


SCOPE

Vehicular communication is characterized by diverse environments, high mobility of both the communicating entities and their surroundings, and comparatively low antenna heights on vehicles. These characteristics are very different from classical cellular cases and make the vehicular propagation and channel modeling particularly challenging. Additionally, the ultimate goal of next generation Vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication systems is enabling accident-free cooperative automated driving. To achieve this goal, the communication system will need to enable a diverse set of use cases, which can result in channel conditions not fully explored in the past (e.g., blockage effects caused by densely packed platooning vehicles, communication between vehicles and vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists, etc.). Finally, in recent years, different frequency bands have been proposed for V2X communications (e.g., in centimeter wave bands, millimeter wave bands, and in visible light spectrum). The impact of frequency band and the propagation characteristics of high frequency (millimeter wave) V2X channels, etc. become very important objects of investigation.

TOPICS

General Topics:

  • Channel modeling
  • Channel measurements
  • V2X communications
  • 5G mobile communication
  • Physical layer
  • Wireless channels
  • Antenna arrays
  • Next generation networks
  • Vehicular communications

Specific Research Topics:

  • Channel models and measurements for V2V, V2I, V2P, and V2N communication
  • Measurement campaigns in:
    • Sub-6 GHz (centimeter wave in 700 MHz – 6 GHz)
    • higher frequencies incl. millimeter wave (6 GHz – 100 GHz)
    • in visible light spectrum
  • Measurement campaigns in:
    • Urban environments
    • Highway environments
    • Rural/suburban environments
    • Indoor (parking garages)
    • Train/Railway environments
  • Effects of highly mobile scatterers on V2X channels
  • Impact of dual mobility on V2X channels
  • Blockage modeling
  • Channel modeling and characterization in platooning scenarios
  • Modeling spatial and temporal consistency for V2X channels
  • Frequency-dependent parametrization of V2X channel models
  • Comparision of different frequency bands for V2X
  • Simulation environments in support of more realistic channel modeling (mobility modeling, environment modeling, modeling of new communication modes such as V2P)
  • Implementation of V2X-specific channel models in existing frameworks
  • Results from large experimental testbeds and field operational tests related to V2X channel modeling
  • V2X-specific antenna design and placement, and their impact on channel
  • Channel models for multi antenna systems
  • Advances in geometry-based stochastic V2X channel modeling
  • Advances in geometry-based deterministic V2X channel modeling

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

WORKSHOP ORGANIZERS AND CO-CHAIRS

Taimoor Abbas, Volvo Cars, Sweden
Mate Boban, Huawei Technologies Duesseldorf GmbH, Germany (Lead Co-Chair)
Jian Luo, Huawei Technologies Duesseldorf GmbH, Germany
Reiner Thomä, TU Ilmenau, Germany
Fredrik Tufvesson, Lund University, Sweden

MORE INFO

E-mail: workshop.ws-11.co-chairs@pimrc2017.org

Workshop homepage:

 

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Review paper submission:  2017-07-28
  • Notification of acceptance: 2017-08-11
  • Camera-ready submission: 2017-08-18

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES

Warning on Plagiarism

Papers will be reviewed on the basis that they do not contain plagiarized material and have not been submitted to any other conference at the same time (double submission). These matters are taken very seriously and the IEEE will take action against any author who has engaged in either practice.

IEEE Web Page on Plagiarism

IEEE Web Page on Double Submission

Notice on Required Registration Fees

To be published in the IEEE PIMRC 2017 Conference Proceedings and IEEE Xplore®, an author of an accepted paper or demo presentation is required to register for the conference at the FULL or LIMITED (IEEE member or non-member) rate and must present the paper or the demo at the conference. Some papers might be presented as posters. Non-refundable registration fees must be paid prior to uploading the final IEEE-formatted publication-ready version of the paper along with any overlength charges for each camera-ready manuscript in excess of five (5) pages up to a maximum of seven (7). For authors with multiple accepted papers or demo presentations, one FULL or LIMITED registration is valid, respectively, for up to three (3) papers ALL belonging either to the regular tracks, to the SAME workshop, or to the SAME special session, and for up to three (3) demos presentations.

What is a “Student Paper”?

A manuscript whose first author is a student. Once you start the manuscript submission process on EDAS, you are asked to check a box “Student Paper?”. Please do so if applicable. The sole purpose of identifying student papers is to check their eligibility to PIMRC’s Best Student Paper contests! Nothing else. So please make sure that you don’t miss the opportunity of being considered for these awards if you are eligible.

Submission Format

Authors are required to make sure that the PDF file and the EDAS registration page of a submitted paper have the same list of authors, title, and abstract (minor wording differences in the abstract are ok). Failure to comply with this rule may lead to the withdrawal of your paper from the review process. Please note that the authors list of an accepted paper CANNOT be changed in the final manuscript.

All submissions should be written in English with a maximum paper length of seven (7) printed double-column pages (10-point font) including figures. Authors of accepted papers with camera-ready versions exceeding 5 pages will be requested to pay mandatory over-length charges per extra page in excess of five (5) up to seven (7), for their papers to be published in the IEEE PIMRC 2017 Conference Proceedings and submitted for inclusion in IEEE Xplore®.

Standard IEEE conference templates for LaTeX formats are found here  (cf. Note 1 below).

You can also use the sample template for Microsoft Word in US Letter format  (cf. Note 1 below).

Only PDF files generated by Acrobat 5 or later versions will be accepted for both the review processing and final publication steps. Camera-ready versions  of accepted papers must be certified by PDFeXpress.

Both review versions of submitted papers and camera-ready versions of accepted papers should not embed bookmarks, form fields, or URL links (cf. Note 2 below), neither contain page numbers, headers, footers, or PDF annotations. Paper pages should be in US Letter format with left and right margins of at least 1 in, a top and bottom margins of at least 0.75 in and 1 in, respectively, and a gutter of 0.1 in between columns  (cf. Notes 3 and 4 below).

Note 1: For the sake of helping prospective authors avoid any upload issues, the generic IEEE templates previously made available at this link were updated for them by the Organizing Committee on 18 May to make them immediately compliant with the PIMRC 2017 format constraints indicated above.

Note 2: Please make sure that you remove hyperlinks to all email addresses in the authors’ affiliations or to all webpage reference citations in the bibliography section.

Note 3: Complying with the PIMRC 2017 format constraints indicated above might not be sufficient to avoid PDF upload issues on EDAS. In case you face embedded fonts issues, please refer to the following IEEE Tutorial.

Note 4: For authors using the LaTeX template, a warning may show up once their papers are uploaded successfully. If the warning indicates that you are exceeding the right margin at the last page (i.e., where your references are most likely listed), you can ignore it! In fact, the IEEE template does not allow to break a reference, leading to an “underfull vbox” warning, but the final result will be much more like what the IEEE will publish.