IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications
08-13 October 2017 – Montreal, QC, Canada

KEYNOTES

IEEE PIMRC 2017 is pleased to announce the plenary and workshop keynote speeches confirmed and scheduled within the technical program of the conference.

Date Time   Room: Montréal Ballroom
  Plenary Keynote Speaker Keynote Speech
Tuesday
10 October
11:10-11:30 KP-01 Luc Noiseux, SVP and CTSO, Cogeco, Canada “An MSO Vision of the Network of the Future”
11:30-12:00 KP-02 Thrishantha Nanayakkara, Head of the Robotics and Manufacturing Theme, Imperial College London, UK “Surviving in an Uncertain World with Slow Communication Pathways”
15:00-16:00 KP-03 Ryuji Kohno, Director, Centre of Medical ICT; and Professor, Yokohama National University, Japan “Wireless Dependable IoT/M2M for Reliable Machine Centric Sensing and Controlling of Medical Devices, Cars and Others”
Wednesday 11 October 11:00-12:00 KP-04 Siavash Alamouti, President & CEO, mimik, USA “Decentralization: The Next Revolution in Computing and Communications”
15:00-16:00 KP-05 Klaus David, Professor, Kassel University, Germany “The Wireless Seat Belt: An Innovative Approach for Car2P/VRU Safety Based on 5G And Machine Learning”
Thursday 12 October 11:00-12:00 KP-06 Javan Erfanian, Chief Editor, NGMN 5G Initiative; and Distinguished Member of Technology, Wireless Technology Strategy, Bell Canada “Building the Road to 5G”
15:00-16:00 KP-07 Hikmet Sari, Chief Scientist, Sequans Communications; and Professor, NUPT, China “Multiple Access for 5G – Challenges Ahead”

Date Time Room Workshop   Workshop Keynote Speaker Keynote Speech
Tuesday
10 October
08:30-09:20 Lachine WS-07 KW-01 Amit Mukhopadhyay, Group Leader – Future Wireless Networks Modeling, Bell Labs Consulting, Murray Hill, USA “IoT: Multiple Facets of its Impact on the Economy and our Society”
13:00‑14:00 Lachine WS-07 KW-02 Ali Khayrallah, Engineering Director, Ericsson Research, Santa Clara, USA “5G for Smart City and Connected Industry”
13:00‑14:00 Verdun WS-06 KW-03 Yang-Seok Choi, Director of RSE, Wireless Architect, Intel, USA “Full-Duplex MIMO – Algorithms and PoC Performance”
14:00-15:00 Verdun WS-06 KW-04 Yingbo Hua, Professor, University of California, Riverside, USA “Secure Wireless Communication with Full-Duplex Radio”
Wednesday 11 October 08:30-09:00 Lasalle WS-10 KW-05 Kai Niu, Professor, BUPT, China “Learning to Decode”
13:00-13:45 Lachine WS-08 KW-06 Frederick W. Vook, Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff, Nokia Bell Labs, USA “Massive MIMO for the New Radio”
13:40-14:30 Lasalle WS-11 KW-07 Fredrik Tufvesson, Professor, Lund University, Sweden “Channel Characteristics for Cooperative ITS and Positioning”
15:00-16:00 Lasalle WS-11 KW-08 David Steer, Staff Engineer, Huawei Canada Research Centre, Canada “Observations on V2X Channel Modeling Requirements and Standards”
Thursday 12 October 08:30‑09:20 Lasalle WS-04 KW-09 Toktam Mahmoodi, Associate Professor, King’s College London, United Kingdom “Wireless Network Virtualization, Business Opportunities and Economic Aspects”
13:00‑13:30 Verdun WS-01 KW-10 Masoud Ardakani, Professor, University of Alberta, Canada “Efficient Coding for Cloud Storage”

 

ABSTRACT

Multiple System Operators or MSOs have come a long way from their origin as distributors of TV signals. They are today at the forefront of the broadband Internet industry serving a broad segment of the population. In this keynote, Luc Noiseux shares his perspective on some of the driving forces shaping the industry as MSOs continue on their journey. Consumer trends, technological advances such as 5G, and regulatory policies form together the cornerstones of a changing environment to which MSOs are adapting by developing the network of the future. A vision of how this network might impact our lives in the future is proposed though the viewing of a short video.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 11:10-11:30, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Luc Noiseux, SVP and CTSO, Cogeco, Canada

Luc Noiseux was named Senior Vice President and Chief Technology and Strategy Officer in August 2016. He has more than 20 years of broad experience in communications, defining and promoting vision, leading execution, and delivering large, cutting-edge technology programs to market. Most recently, he was Vice President Research & Development at Accedian Networks, responsible for the Chief of Technology office and for product development. Previously, Mr. Noiseux also held several senior management roles at Alcatel-Lucent. He holds a Master’s degree in Mathematics and Telecommunications from the Université du Québec’s Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) as well as a dual eMBA from the Université du Québec à Montréal and the Université Paris Dauphine.

ABSTRACT

In this talk, we discuss channel characteristics of wireless vehicular channel and how those affect the possibilities to perform radio based positioning based on already available wireless signals. We review vehicular channel properties, and look at how cellular 5G trends will affect the possibility of performing radio based positioning. We discuss multilink behaviour and the influence of shadowing from other vehicles. We also consider detailed scatterer behaviour and discuss the possibility for multipath assisted positioning. Finally, we wrap up by summarizing different channel modelling approaches for the vehicular channel and their suitability with respect to positioning.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Wednesday, October 11, 13:40-14:30, Lasalle

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Fredrik Tufvesson, Professor, Lund University, Sweden

Fredrik Tufvesson received his Ph.D. in 2000 from Lund University in Sweden. After two years at a startup company, he joined the department of Electrical and Information Technology at Lund University, where he is now professor of radio systems. His main research interests is the interplay between the radio channel and the rest of the communication system with various applications in 5G systems such as massive MIMO, mm wave communication, vehicular communication and radio based positioning. Fredrik has authored around 65 journal papers and 130 conference papers, he is fellow of the IEEE and recently he got the Neal Shepherd Memorial Award for the best propagation paper in IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology.

ABSTRACT

One of the keys to successful radio communications is a good understanding of the radio channel characteristics. The channel behavior and communications performance is affected by the wavelength, the environment and the motion of the sender and the receiver. In the V2X environment, in which both the transmitter and receiver are at low levels in the clutter, blockage is a particular concern for short wavelengths. A number of channel models have recently been developed for 5G communications services based on general measurements. Most of these measurement campaigns have been made to extract parameters for the average channel statistical behavior in which one end of the link is above the clutter. Here we will discuss their possible application and shortcomings for the difficult V2X environment and the need for reliable communication.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Wednesday, October 11, 15:00-16:00, Lasalle

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

David Steer, Staff Engineer, Huawei Canada Research Centre, Canada

David Steer is a Staff Engineer at the Huawei Canada Research Centre in Kanata Ontario Canada. His current interests include the physics of mmWave channel modelling, spectrum management and radio technology for next generation mobile systems. David began his communications career in the days of cross-bar voice circuit switching at Bell-Northern Research in 1974. Since then the work has included communications security systems, personal radio communications, 3GPP/ETSI standards, spectrum management and latterly mmWave technology for mobile systems. In this process he became a named inventor for some 100 issued patents for communications. David has a PhD with a thesis topic in radio astronomy from the University of British Columbia (1984) and degrees in Physics/Electrical engineering from Queen’s University Kingston Ontario (1972/1974). David is a Life Member of the IEEE.

ABSTRACT

This presentation will provide an overview of Massive MIMO as it is being defined in the 3GPP New Radio standardization effort. The unique aspects of 3GPP NR-MIMO will be discussed, and recent system level simulations will be presented comparing the performance characteristics of NR-MIMO with the MIMO techniques in LTE for sub-6GHz systems. NR-MIMO performance characteristics in the mmWave bands will also be discussed.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Wednesday, October 11, 13:00-13:45, Lachine

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Frederick W. Vook, Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff, Nokia Bell Labs, USA

Frederick W. Vook received the B.S. degree from Syracuse University in 1987 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from The Ohio State University in 1989 and 1992, respectively, all in electrical engineering. From 1992 to 1995, he was with the Motorola Wireless Data Group where he worked on 19 GHz and 2.4 GHz propagation modeling and air-interface design for Motorola’s wireless LAN products. From 1995 to 2008, he was with Motorola Laboratories, where he worked on MIMO, beamforming, and air interface design for broadband mobile communication systems. From 2008-2011, Dr. Vook was with Motorola Home & Networks Mobility where he worked on physical layer modeling and MIMO techniques for IEEE 802.16/WiMAX and LTE Rel-8-10. Since 2011, he has been with Nokia, Arlington Heights, IL, where his current work involves advanced antenna array solutions for LTE and 5G cellular systems.

ABSTRACT

This talk will share insight on requirements, challenges, realities, roadmap, and key design principles and architectural considerations, to enable wide range of use cases with diverse requirements. A major question in this path is the notion of migration, and how the different paradigms of densification, virtualization, softwarization and cloudification come together in a service based and agile architecture. While a number of phases will remain to be realized in the context of 5G vision, a great number of research topics are essential to be investigated for this to be successful with respect to its expected capabilities, use cases, experience and impact.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Thursday , October 12, 11:00-12:00, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Javan Erfanian, Chief Editor, NGMN 5G Initiative; and Distinguished Member of Technology, Wireless Technology Strategy, Bell Canada

As Distinguished Member of Technology, at Bell Mobility, Canada, Javan primes the wireless technology strategic direction and industry initiatives. In this role, Javan has worked with the global industry and various forums, and also the research community. In particular, he has been contributing to the work programs at NGMN, most recently the 5G global initiative, for which he was the Co-Lead & the Chief Editor, which led to the publication of the NGMN 5G White Paper in March. He continues to be actively engaged in the ongoing work on the technology / industry roadmap and the road to 5G at NGMN, and elsewhere. Javan Grew up in Iran, and completed his education at the University of Calgary and the University of Toronto, with research publications and many citations. He has taught many academic and industry courses and programs. In his IEEE involvement, Javan has been a Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer for years, an editor and author for the Wireless Engineering Book of Knowledge, and a recipient of the IEEE Millennium Medal (2000).

ABSTRACT

Virtualization in wireless networks has been mainly driven by the cost factor, however, it has proven to bring new insight in the business model of mobile and wireless networks. Therefore, economics of network virtualisation (NV) can be seen from two different angles including the way NV impacts cost and the way NV impact business relations. The first part of this talk will focus on how network virtualisation impacts OPEX and CAPEX, together with some detailed examples of the IoT and industrial networking. On the other hand, virtualisation enables the mobile wireless ecosystem to evolve from being an environment of bilateral relationship between operators and customers, to a plethora of industries providing services at different positions of the value chain. The second part of this talk, therefore, is focused on how the new business relations are shaped in the virtualized networking environment.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Thursday, October 12, 08:30‑09:20, Lasalle

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Toktam Mahmoodi, Associate Professor, King’s College London, United Kingdom

Toktam Mahmoodi is with the academic faculty of the centre for telecommunications research in King’s College London. She is a member of the Tactile Internet Lab and principal and co-investigator on projects in 5G and SDN. Previously, Toktam was visiting research scientist at F5 Networks, post-doctoral research associate in Imperial College London, Mobile VCE researcher, and telecom R&D engineer. Her research focuses on the areas of mobile and cloud networking, and includes ultra-low latency networking, network virtualisation, mobility management, network modelling and optimisation. She also works on applications of mobile communications in the healthcare, smart cities, industrial networks and intelligent transportation.


ABSTRACT

The technology development and standardization of 5G radio access have been rapidly progressing. In addition to enhancing mobile broadband (MBB) services, 5G aims to enable critical machine type communications (cMTC) and support Internet of Things (IoT) using the same network. This ambition poses stringent design requirements and performance objectives in many different dimensions. For example, in addition to significant improvements in peak data rates and network capacity compared to existing cellular technologies, 5G performance objectives further include ultralow latency and ultra-reliability for cMTC, and superior device energy efficiency, low device cost, ubiquitous coverage reaching devices deep indoors, and ultra-high device connection density for IoT. The three pillars of 5G technologies, enhanced MBB, cMTC, and IoT, extend 5G services to many new use cases. In this talk, we first describe the principles adopted in 5G to achieve its performance objectives. We then give examples of how 5G enables smart city and connected industry. Smart city use cases promise many social and economic benefits including sustainability, while connected industry will significantly improve efficiency and productivity as well as safety and security.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 13:00‑14:00, Lachine

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Ali Khayrallah, Engineering Director, Ericsson Research, Santa Clara, USA

Ali Khayrallah has been with Ericsson in various research positions, presently in Santa Clara, CA, where he is Engineering Director, and earlier in Research Triangle Park, NC. He leads a team shaping future wireless technology. He has contributed to the development of 5G, 4G, 3G, Bluetooth, mobile satellite etc. Previously, he was on the faculty of the University of Delaware. He received a Ph.D. and an M.S. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a B.Eng. from the American University of Beirut. He holds 100+ patents and received the Ericsson inventor of the year award.


ABSTRACT

Since the early days of civilization, mankind has been relentlessly pursuing automation of routine tasks so that more time is available for satisfying higher order human needs of self-fulfillment. This fundamental characteristic of humanity has enabled the level of advancements in our society that has not been observed in any other form of life. In this talk, we start with precursors of automation that have significantly transformed our civilization. We quickly proceed to early forms of machine communication (i.e., M2M) that laid the foundation of today’s IoT era. Then we identify key industry sectors that are likely to be impacted most with advancements in IoT. We do a deeper dive on three specific sectors – healthcare, automotive and utilities where we provide examples of use cases and business models. In the process, we delve into the roles played by different stakeholders in the value chain right across the industries and examine their share of the total value captured. We conclude with a discussion on the broader impact of IoT on the society – improving quality of life for everyone and catering for self-actualization that paves the way for even greater human achievements in the future.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 08:30-09:20, Lachine

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Amit Mukhopadhyay, Group Leader – Future Wireless Networks Modeling, Bell Labs Consulting,
Murray Hill, USA

Amit Mukhopadhyay leads the Future Wireless Networks Practice in Bell Labs Consulting. He heads a team of experts building models for analyzing performance and economics of next generation networks. His team focuses on future wireless technologies, as well as various fixed broadband access technologies. Dr. Mukhopadhyay’s research interests include architecture, performance and cost optimization for voice, data, and video infrastructure. He has worked with numerous operators around the world, advising them on selecting cost optimal evolution options for addressing traffic growth while preserving Quality of Service. He has 25+ years of experience in designing and optimizing various wireline, wireless and HFC cable networks. His current work focuses on next generation wireless technologies (LTE-Adv, 5G), including small cells, Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) and SelfOrganizing Networks (SON) as well as Internet of Things (IoT). He is also deeply involved in converged IMS networks with other broadband access technologies including xDSL, Fiber and HFC Cable. He has experience of working on SS7, SIP and Diameter signaling as well as QoS requirements of various end-user applications. Prior to joining Bell Labs, he was with Ericsson in the Systems Engineering organization. He co-authored Ericsson’s first Traffic Engineering Handbook for GSM networks. He was the editor of the GSM A-interface specifications for PCS 1900 standards under T1P1.5. He holds a Bachelor of Technology from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India and a Ph. D. in Operations Research from the University of Texas, Dallas. He is a Senior Member of IEEE and received the IEEE Region 1 award. He has 20+ publications in refereed journals and has received seven patent awards. He serves on the college Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).


ABSTRACT

Telecommunication community can benefit from some findings in neuroscience and robotics. The neuroscience community has long been trying to understand how the central nervous system is managing the concurrent control of the whole body with many degrees of freedom to survive in situations that needs fast responses, but with slow communication pathways. The robotics community too has addressed the same problem of surviving in uncertain environments by efficiently solving the concurrent computation problems. In this talk, I will show some recent findings in my lab that show the physical circuits in the body work in conjunction with neural controllers to solve control problems locally. We call this phenomenon – “morphological computation” – the seamless computation that spans across neural, musculo-skeletal, and environmental circuits. I will show how we test some of these hypotheses using laboratory made robotic devices.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 11:30-12:00, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Thrishantha Nanayakkara, Head of the Robotics and Manufacturing Theme, Imperial College London, UK

Thrishantha Nanayakkara is the Head of the Robotics and Manufacturing Theme and a Reader in Design Engineering and Robotics at the Dyson School of Design Engineering, Imperial College London. Thrish has been a senior lecturer in robotics at King’s College London, Radcliffe Fellow, Harvard University, USA, research affiliate at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT, USA, and a research fellow in the department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, USA. His research interests are in morphological computation, soft robotics, and human-robot interaction. For more information, please visit.


ABSTRACT

In the last decade, mobile internet has transformed that way we live and many industries. A major technology shift in the last decade was a move from distributed computing to central cloud computing where content and applications were hosted in data centers and consumed on device on the edge. In the last few years, internet of things (IoT) has become a reality with billions of connected devices and this trend will continue its exponential growth. At the same time, devices are now embedded with cameras and sensors and a significant amount of data is now produced at the edge. For example, one self-driving car generates more than 1GBytes/sec of data which is two orders of magnitude larger than the capacity of an LTE base station and perhaps an order of magnitude larger than a 5G base station. I postulate that the only way to cope with such a drastic increase in the amount of traffic generated at the edge is decentralization and edge cloud computing. I will then highlight the requirements for edge cloud computing and challenges and opportunities of decentralization.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Wednesday, October 11, 11:00-12:00, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Siavash Alamouti, President & CEO, mimik, Canada

Siavash Alamouti is a pioneer and thought leader in open mobile internet. His inventions and industry initiatives have touched everyone globally. His space-time block code (known as Alamouti code) is used in over 10 billion devices. His contributions to the adoption of OFDMA/MIMO in 4G with Mobile WiMAX led to a more open international standard with LTE. He is the visionary behind the WiGig Alliance and inclusion of mmWave technology in the WiFi Alliance Roadmap. Close to 20,000 citations to-date in Google Scholar is an indicator of his level impact on the modern technology landscape. His passionate lobbying for spectrum reform with FCC in the US and globally at ITU opened the path for the adoption of smart antenna and OFDMA technologies in the unlicensed and licensed bands in the US and eventually globally. He is an advocate of decentralized power in business, society, and technology and believes that decentralization is a key factor to ensure a sustainable global ecosystem. In the last few years, he has been quietly focused on enabling distributed edge cloud to help democratize personal data and decentralization of “cloud” and its extension to the edge. Before joining mimik as President & CEO, he was the Group R&D Director at Vodafone in London, UK where he managed R&D, corporate venture, and intellectual property for the entire group. Prior to Vodafone, he was an Intel Fellow and CTO of the Mobile Wireless Group. Before Intel, Alamouti was the CTO at the start up Vivato and prior to that had senior technology roles in Cadence Design Systems, AT&T Wireless Services, McCaw Cellular, and MPR Teltech Ltd.


ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization in its latest report on road safety states that more than 20% of all road traffic deaths comprise pedestrians – far more then a quarter of a million per year. Since many years the automotive industry is working on reducing this number by using passive as well as active approaches (like Camera or LIDAR based systems). Recent advances in mobile communications (LTE and 5G) and Machine Learning allow for an innovative, co-operative Car2P/VRU (car to pedestrian/ vulnerable road user) safety system, which we call Wireless Seat Belt (WSB). Starting from typical accident scenarios, the requirements for such a system, including the requirements on the wireless communications, especially latency, various architectures and an overall system solution are discussed. This includes how machine learning helps to determine the activity of the pedestrian such as walking, standing, or stepping down a curb – based on real-time sensor data of smartphones. This context information and its interpretation is a prerequisite for correcting available sensor data, e.g. increasing position accuracy and for triggering accident avoidance actions. For full acceptance of WSB there are further concerns to be considered, such as privacy protection and the prevention of false alarms. Furthermore, it will be shown, how WSB can be economically viable to various stakeholders and ideas for sustainable business cases are sketched. The keynote provides an indication, why WSB is close to an optimal solution and its advantages compared to other approaches.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Wednesday, October 11, 15:00-16:00, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Klaus David, Professor, Kassel University, Germany

Klaus David is full University Professor since 1998 and since 2000 head of the chair of communication technology (ComTec) at Kassel University, Germany. His research interests include mobile networks, applications and context awareness. He has 12 years of industrial experience in major companies like HP, Bell Northern Research, IMEC, T-Mobile (as Head of Group and UMTS project leader) and IHP (as Head of Department), with five years of international experience in the UK, Belgium, USA, and Japan. He has published over 200 scientific articles, including 3 books, and has registered over 10 patents. He is active in IEEE (Editor in Chief IEEE VT Magazine, BoG IEEE VT), NGMN (next generation mobile networks – the worldwide operator organization) as advisor, WWRF (Wireless World Research Forum) as publication manager and he is involved in many conferences, such as IST Future Network & Mobile Summit 2012 Berlin as TPC chair or in 2013, 14, 15,16, and 18 in IEEE PerCom as TPC member. Also, he is a regular technology and strategy consultant to industry. Klaus David is also co-founder of two start-up companies.


ABSTRACT

In this talk, we present enabling technologies for full-duplex (FD) MIMO. For self-interference cancellation, we have introduced adaptive echo cancellation concept which is based on adaptive filter theory. First, open loop technique is compared to closed loop technique. Closed loop technique such as adaptive echo cancellation continuously updates the system parameters even without requiring special training signal and synchronizations such as OFDM boundary, resulting fast and continuous tracking even during random data transmission. Secondly, even in the presence of stronger desired received signal than self-interference, it provides stable tracking and continuous self-interference cancellation. Thirdly, in MIMO, the SIC complexity increases exponentially. We propose simpler architecture for RF cancellation which requires only one extra downconverter regardless of the number of taps without performance loss. For digital cancellation, bilinear architecture is proposed. RF components can be modeled by a linear combination of kernels. In non-bilinear, an adaptive filter is applied at each kernel. Hence, parallel adaptive filters are required. However, in bilinear architecture, two adaptations are cascaded: one for non-linear RF component modeling and the other for echo channel. Although this architecture significantly reduces the complexity, it has stability issues and creates too large dynamics of intermediate variables which prevent from efficient HW implementation. We have solved these shortcomings and will show demo videos of 2×2 MIMO FD system exhibiting that residual self-interference is below noise.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 13:00‑14:00, Verdun

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Yang-Seok Choi, Principal Engneer, Wireless Architect Leader, Intel, USA

Yang-Seok Choi received B.S. degree from Korea University, Seoul, South Korea in 1990, M.S.E.E. degree from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon, South Korea, in 1992, and Ph.D. degree from Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY, in 2000, all in electrical engineering. He has been in industry for 25 years in AT&T Labs-Research, Samsung, National semiconductor and a start-up. He joined Intel in 2004 and led WiMax PHY Standards development team. In 2013 he joined Intel Labs and is a manger leading Wireless Interference Technology team. He has been focusing on future wireless communications in Intel Labs. He holds 60+ U.S. patents.


ABSTRACT

Billions of people around the world are interconnected via wireless communication devices for our daily lives and business transactions. Privacy and security have become a top concern as wireless networks are prone to eavesdroppers due to shared physical medium. The physical layer security on top of cryptography is essential to mitigate this concern. The technology of full-duplex radio which is able to transmit and receive at the same time and same frequency is uniquely equipped to ensure a high level of information security. A full-duplex radio is able to jam (although briefly as necessary) all potential eavesdroppers as it receives a secret key from another radio. In this talk, I will present some of the latest developments in understanding the limits and potentials of full-duplex radio in secure wireless communications. In particular, I will highlight cases of known versus unknown channel state information, static versus fading channels, and colluded versus uncolluded eavesdroppers.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 14:00-15:00, Verdun

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Yingbo Hua, Professor, University of California Riverside, USA

Yingbo Hua is a senior full professor with the University of California, Riverside, where he joined in 2001. Prior to that, he held a faculty position with the University of Melbourne, Australia, from 1990 to 2000. He received his Ph.D. degree from Syracuse University in 1988. Professor Hua has published hundreds of articles in the fields of signal processing, wireless communications and sensor networks, including a dozen on full-duplex radio technology. He was elected to IEEE Fellow in 2001 and AAAS Fellow in 2011. He is currently a Senior Area Editor for IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, a Steering Committee Member for IEEE Wireless Communications Letters, and an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Signal and Information Processing over Networks.


ABSTRACT

Distributed storage systems (DSSs) provide anytime anywhere access to one’s data. In order to provide reliability and availability, triple replication method (in which three copies of each block of data is stored) has been traditionally used in DSSs. Considering the high storage overhead of replication methods, new reliable storage methods such as locally repairable codes (LRCs) have recently attracted the attention of both theoreticians and practitioners. A linear block code with dimension k, length n, and minimum distance d is called an LRC with locality r if it can retrieve any coded symbol by at most r other coded symbols. LRCs have been recently used in Facebook HDFS and Windows Azure Storage. In this talk we discuss three results on LRCs. All these results are built around a novel graphical approach to LRC design. First, we discuss the problem of designing binary LRCs (BLRCs). BLRCs are of great importance as they can significantly decrease coding complexity by eliminating costly multiplication calculations. Second, we study the average locality of LRCs. This is in contrast with existing results which mainly study the maximum locality. Reducing the average locality of an LRC directly decreases the costly repair bandwidth, disk I/O, and overhead associated with accessing nodes during a repair process. Finally, we briefly discuss the problem of update complexity in DSSs.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Thursday, October 12, 13:00‑13:30, Verdun

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Masoud Ardakani, Professor, University of Alberta, Canada

Masoud Ardakani received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Toronto, Canada, in 2004. He was a Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto from 2004 to 2005. He is currently a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Alberta, Canada. His research interests are in the general area of information and communication theory. Dr. Ardakani serves as an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS and has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS and as a senior editor for the IEEE COMMUNICATION LETTERS.


ABSTRACT

Recently machine learning becomes an active direction in the area of artificial intelligence. Essentially, the general decoding problem can also be viewed as a form of pattern recognition. In this speech, we discuss the some typical decoding algorithms under the frame work of artificial neural networks (ANN). We retrospect the applications of ANN in Viterbi decoding for the convolutional codes and belief propagation (BP) decoding for the LDPC codes. Specifically, we also analyze ANN decoding for the polar codes. The advantages and disadvantages of ANN decoding are summarized.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Wednesday, October 11, 08:30-09:00, Lasalle

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Kai Niu, Professor, BUPT, China

Kai Niu received a B.S. in information engineering and a Ph.D in signal and information processing from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT) in 1998 and 2003 respectively. Then he joined the Information Theory and Technique Center, BUPT. Currently he is a professor in School of Information and Communication Engineering, BUPT. He is a senior member of Chinese Institute of Electronics. Professor Niu’s research areas of interests include: polar code, iterative signal processing, MIMO signal processing. He published 200+ papers and held 36 China patents in the fields of polar coding, iterative decoding and MIMO detection.


ABSTRACT

In a trend of 5G and IoT, one of the most crucial demands is enhanced dependability in wireless networks to guarantee worst performance with evidence. Many of service networks such as remote medicine, autonomous car driving need such a dependable wireless network that worst and average performance can be guaranteed within a permissible range in every case but defined specific use cases. This must be an honest and trustable manner for any stakeholders. In medical use case, wireless body area network (BAN) has been researched and developed for ubiquitous and remote medicine and its international standard IEEE802.15.6 was established but has been demanded for amendment for enhanced dependability. Interest Group (IG) in IEEE802.15 has been trying to establish a new standard for enhanced dependability for M2M or machine centric sensing and controlling of car driving and manufacturing and other use cases in which worst and average performance should be guaranteed in wireless networks for remote monitoring sensors and controlling actuators and robotics. In fact, to find missing victims and sense their vital sign at disaster spots, highly reliable and secure, i.e. dependable BAN can be applicable to a body of robots, cars, UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicle) like drones as well as a human body for dependable machine to machine (M2M) sensing and controlling. To perform precise localization and robust data communications by BAN, dependable radio technologies such as ultra wide band (UWB) radio, array antenna and error-controlling codes in physical layer must be jointly optimized with MAC, Network, and application layers. Even after BAN has been developed and standardized in global, regulatory science must be keen to guarantee safety, reliability and security to be compliant for regulation. This talk will introduce research and development, standard and regulatory compliance of dependable wireless IoT/M2M for medical, automotive, disaster resilient systems and services. IEEE802.15 international new standard group of dependable wireless networks IEEE802.15 IG-Dependability will be addressed.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Tuesday, October 10, 15:00-16:00, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Ryuji Kohno, Director, Centre of Medical Information and Communication Technology; and Professor, Yokohama National University, Japan

Ryuji Kohno received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Tokyo in 1984. Since 1998 he has been a Professor and the Director of Centre on Medical Information and Communication Technology, in Yokohama National University in Japan. In his currier he played a part-time role of a director of Advanced Telecommunications Laboratory of SONY CSL during 1998-2002, directors of UWB Technology and medical ICT institutes of NICT during 2002-2012. Since 2012 he is CEO of University of Oulu Research Institute Japan – CWC-Nippon Co. Since 2007 he has been a distinguished professor in University of Oulu in Finland and since 2014 a director of Kanagawa Medical Device Regulatory Science Centre. He was a member of the Board of Governors of IEEE Information Theory Society in 2000-2009, and editors of IEEE Transactions on Communications, Information Theory, and ITS. He was Vice-president of Engineering Sciences Society of IEICE during 2004-2005, Editor-in chief of the IEICE Trans. Fundamentals during 2003-2005.


ABSTRACT

Multiple access refers to the way radio resources are shared among different users. The multiple access techniques used in 2G and 3G cellular networks were time-division multiple access (TDMA) and code-division multiple access (CDMA), both being used in conjunction with single-carrier transmission. A big leap came out when WiFi and 4G cellular standards were developed. All of these networks adopted orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) for transmission, but they differed in the way the radio resources were shared. While WiFi continued to use conventional TDMA, WiMAX used orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA), and 3GPP LTE used OFDMA on the downlink and single-carrier frequency-division multiple access (SC-FDMA) on the uplink. For the development of future 5G, while OFDMA and some of its variants stand up as the major technology, there are a number of proposals based on non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) whose basic principle is to superpose user signals and make use of serial interference cancellation at the receiver. In this talk, after giving a historical review, we will describe the basic principle of NOMA, and discuss its potential and the related challenges.

DATE, TIME, AND MEETING ROOM

Thursday , October 12, 15:00-16:00, Montréal Ballroom

ABOUT THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Hikmet Sari, Chief Scientist, Sequans Communications; and Professor, NUPT, China

Hikmet Sari is currently Chief Scientist at Sequans Communications and Professor at Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (NUPT). From 2003 to 2016, he was Professor and Head of the Telecommunications Department at Supelec. Previously, he held various research and management positions at Philips, SAT (SAGEM Group), Alcatel, Pacific Broadband Communications, and Juniper Networks. He received his Engineering Diploma and Ph.D. from the ENST, Paris, and the Habilitation degree from the University of Paris-Sud. His distinctions include the IEEE Fellow Grade and the Blondel Medal in 1995, the Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award in 2003, the Harold Sobol Award in 2012, and election to the European Academy and to the Science Academy of Turkey in 2012. Dr. Sari has served the IEEE Communications Society in numerous volunteer and leadership positions including Vice President – Conferences, Distinguished Lecturer, Member of the IEEE Fellow Evaluation Committee, Member of the Awards Committee, Member of several Technical Committees, Chair of the GITC, Chair of the Communication Theory Symposium of ICC 2002, Technical Program Chair of ICC 2004, Executive Chair of ICC 2006, General Chair of PIMRC 2010, General Chair of WCNC 2012, Executive Chair of WCNC 2014, Executive Co-Chair of ICC 2016, Executive Chair of ICC 2017, Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Communications, Associate Editor of the IEEE Communications Letters, and Guest Editor of IEEE JSAC. He also served as General Chair of ICUWB 2014, Technical Program Chair of EuCNC 2015, and General Co-Chair of ATC 2016.